Sunday, April 11, 2010

Ten Reasons To Move To Canada

Beaterblog isn't getting political - this is just a listing of ten cars that you can get in Canada that you can't get in the US. And every one is for sale right now, just click on the title! Maybe these vehicles aren't enough reason to move to Canada alone but if you're already fond of hockey, Tim Horton's, and poutine, maybe one of these slightly oddball automobiles will tip the balance.

1. Hyundai Pony

Before we got the pleasure of dealing with the Hyundai Excel, Canada was sorting out the Hyundai brand for us. The rear-wheel-drive pony sported many Mitsubishi bits and pieces such and the engine, transmission, and rear axle. It does have a 4G series motor, which could have some potential.







2. Lada Niva

If America's such a free place, why the hell can't I buy a communist car?! The Lada Niva may be the closest thing to a good Soviet vehicle. Unlike it's sedan counterparts, the austerity is welcome in the rugged, no frills off roader. These were sold from 1976 to 1997 and although the are easy to find, nice ones are becoming very rare.







3. Skoda 120

Although America was forced to part with the Skoda in 1967, Canadian sales continued until as late as 1993. These rear-engined Czechoslovakian compacts were famous for rallying as well as being commie cars with a bit of flare, like a bread line but where the people are conversing.








4. Acadian Beaumont

While the Chevelle was made for those who wanted to rip a smokey burnout in front of Wal-Mart while shotgunning a Coors Light tallboy, the Beaumont was made for those mulleted gentlemen who preferred burnin' 'em down in front of Canadian Tire while slamming Laker Lager.







5. Diesel Series 60 Toyota Landcruiser

Of course, you now see far more Japanese Diesel stuff coming to Canada because their import laws don't suck as hard as ours (15 years instead of 25 years) but Canada even got the Diesel Landcruiser legitimately in the eighties. It wasn't always a particularly potent Diesel, but it's the principle of the matter.







6. Pontiac Tempest
While the old rope-drive Tempest is one of the best cars ever, the only reason someone would want the late Canadian Tempest (why not Blizzard?) is to confuse their stateside car friends. Other than a couple of upside down maroon triangles in place of bow ties, slightly different grill and taillights, there wasn't much to differentiate the Corsica from the Tempest.


7. Hyundai Stellar

Get ready for this: Korean built Ford Cortina based entry level luxo-barge. Why didn't we get this in the US? The power accessories likely predated power anything in the US-bound Hyundais by at least a half a decade. The Giugiaro was the cutting edge in boxiness, even out box-ing rivals like the Toyota Cressida and Nissan Maxima by up to 42%.






8. Mercury M-250

There really isn't anything that differentiates these trucks from their Americans counterparts, save for a longer name on the hood and tailgate. If you must have a Ford truck but also find them quite boring, maybe a trip over the Ambassador bridge is in the cards for you.








9. Passport Optima

Behold, the last word in badge engineering. The Passport Optima may also be referred to as the Daewoo Cielo, Daewoo Pointer, Daewoo Heaven, Daewoo Maespy, Daewoo Racer, Daewoo Super Racer, Daewoo 1.5i, Daewoo Nexia, Daewoo Fantasy (wierd), Daewoo LeMans, Pontiac Lemans, Asuna SE, Asuna GT, Opel Kadett, Chevrolet Nexia, Vauxhall Astra, Holden Astra, Opel Monza, Vauxhall Bellmont, Chevrolet Kadett, Chevrolet Ipanema, and Shinjin Maepsy-na. There are so many, they are almost collectible. The Passport Optima is the automotive equivalent of the can of Dr. Perky in your knock-off Dr. Pepper collection.

10. Lada Signet

This vehicle needs no introduction, for it is the ultimate in Soviet automotive technology. You've seen countless of its brothers blown up or run over by tanks in Goldeneye but in Canada, you can actually drive one. There aren't many left, but if you start looking, start around the Calgary area where the road salt hasn't gobbled them all up yet.

1 comment:

  1. Life for the Ford Cortina started on September 1962. Originally intended to be called the Ford Consul 325. But later the name has changed to Cortina after inspiration from the Italian ski resort Cortina d’Ampezzo.

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